Storytime: The Legend of the Teddy Bear

Special thanks to our friends at the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site for their help in making this video!

In honor of President’s Day, today we’re reading The Legend of the Teddy Bear by Frank Murphy. While nearly everyone has a memory of their own favorite tattered teddy bear, the details of the day President Theodore “Teddy” Roosevelt refused to shoot a bear have been lost to time.

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Sanity Savers, STEM Edition: Christine Darden’s Paper Jets

Presented by National Grid

Written By Dan Walsh
STEM Educator

Supplies:

Paper, hole puncher, rubber band 

Length: 

10 minutes 

Academic Subjects:  

Science  

ETS1.A: Defining Engineering Problems- Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints)

Directions for Christine Darden’s Paper Jets:  

Christine Darden is an American mathematician, data analyst, and aeronautical engineer who devoted much of her 40-year career in aerodynamics at NASA to researching supersonic flight and sonic booms

People Focused Shareable
  1. Start by folding your paper in half.
  2. Open the piece of paper back up. Fold each half at an angle to form a triangle at the top of your paper.  
  3. Fold the top edges to the center line and then close the paper. 
  4. Fold the wings down to meet the bottom of the body. 
  5. Using a hole puncher, punch a hole at the very tip of the nose. 
  6. Pull a rubber-band through the hole. 
  7. Using both hands, hold the rubber-band from both ends. Pull one side of the rubber-band through the other. 
  8. The rubber-band should be secured to the plane. 
  9. Make sure the area is clear, using both hands, hold the back of the plane and pull the rubber-band back with your other hand. Using both hands, hold the back of the jet and the rubber-band. Once the area is clear let go of both the rubber-band and jet at the same time! Watch how fast it goes!

Christine Darden’s Paper Jet’s Vocabulary: 

Geometry– A branch of mathematics that deals with shapes, lines, and points. 
Orbit– The path of an object around particular point in space. 

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Sanity Savers, STEM Edition: Shoot for the Stars with Mae Jemison

Presented by National Grid

Written By Dan Walsh
STEM Educator

Supplies:

Different colors of construction paper, scissors, glue 

Length: 

10 minutes 

Academic Subjects:  

Science  

ETS1.A: Defining Engineering Problems- Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints)

Directions for Shoot For The Stars with Mae Jemison 

Mae Jemison was born in 1956. Jemison graduated from Stanford University with degrees in chemical engineering as well as African and African-American studies. She then earned her medical degree from Cornell University. Mae Jemison is an engineer, physician, and NASA astronaut. Jemison was the first black woman to travel to space aboard the space ship Endeavour. Jemison spent around eight days in space and orbited the earth 127 times. After landing Jemison resigned from NASA to become a philanthropist. A philanthropist is a person who seeks to promote the welfare of others. Let’s celebrate Mae Jemison by creating a geometric space ship or hospital! 

Mae Jemison on space shuttle Endeavour in Sep. 1992. Jemison was the first African-American woman in space with her first flight to space in Sep. 1992. Photo obtained from NASA
  1. Cut your construction paper into squares, rectangles, circles, and triangles. 
  2. Grab a piece of black construction paper to use as a base. 
  3. Place your shapes down onto the black construction paper, try to build one of Mae Jemison’s different occupations. You could build a space ship or even a hospital. 
  4. Once you have your design done, you can use a glue stick to glue your pieces down. 

Shoot For The Stars with Mae Jemison Vocabulary: 

Geometry– A branch of mathamtics that deals with shapes, lines, and points. 
Orbit– The path of an object around particular point in space. 

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Storytime: Ms. Jackie Reads The Snowy Day

Thanks to the generous support of Mother Cabrini Health Foundation for making this Storytime possible.

Ms. Jackie Reads The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats. Universal in its appeal, this story beautifully depicts a child’s wonder at a new world, and the hope of capturing and keeping that wonder forever. The quiet fun and sweetness of Peter’s small adventures in the deep, deep snow is perfect for reading together on a cozy winter day.

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Sanity Saver: George Washington Carver’s Inventions

By: Dan Walsh
STEM Educator

George Washington Carver was an inventor, environmentalist, and a professor. Carver was a professor of Agriculture at the Tuskegee Institute which is now known as Tuskegee University. While teaching Carver created over 300 different uses for the peanut. For today’s experiment, we will be using Carver as an inspiration as we try to create our own inventions from supplies we have around the house. When scientists invent new things they go through a list of steps called the invention process. Follow the steps below to create your own invention. 

Materials:

Random collection of materials you find around the house

Length:

10 minutes

Academic Subject(s):

Science 

THIS LESSON SUPPORTS THESE STANDARDS: 
ETS1.A: Defining Engineering Problems- Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints) 

Directions:

 STEP 1 First, think of a problem. 
STEP 2 Look at all of the supplies you have collected. Try to think of a way to solve the problem with the supplies you have. 
STEP 3 Next we will brainstorm as many ways to solve the problem as you can. 
STEP 4 Using the supplies in your bag, build one of your inventions. 
STEP 5 Once your invention is finished, test your invention out. 
STEP 6 If your invention does not work the first time, don’t get frustrated. Try to tinker with your experiment until it works. 
STEP 7 Finally show your invention to your friends and family. 

Vocabulary Words

 INVENTION: The first time something has been built. 
INNOVATION: When a scientist tinkers on an invention and makes it better. 
AGRICULTURE: The science or practice of farming. 

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