Sanity Savers: Finding a Rainbow

By: Amelia Schrader
Senior Manager of Learning and Education

Materials:

Color Hunt Worksheets (indoor and outdoor)

Length:

Activity Time: Unlimited!

Academic Subject:

English Language Arts (ELA)Arts Science
Development Subject Areas: Cognition – Knowledge of the World  

Photo by Yulia Gadalina on Unsplash
Photo by Yulia Gadalina on Unsplash

It is National Find a Rainbow Day! Do you know why rainbows tend to form after a rainy day as soon as the sun comes out? That is because a rainbow is a refraction of the sun’s light through water droplets.

We are here for a fun rainbow-themed activity that you can do inside or outside. Use our guided indoor and/or outdoor scavenger hunt worksheets to go on a quest to find a rainbow!!  

Download the worksheets here

Worksheet 1

Worksheet 2


While working on this activity you can use the vocabulary words below to further enhance the lesson.
· Can you identify which colors of the rainbow are primary colors and which are secondary colors? ·  For the indoor scavenger hunt, can you create a pattern with the items you collected?
· Practice counting the items. Which category has the most items? Which has the least?

Vocabulary Words

· Primary Colors: These colors cannot be created by mixing together other colors. The primary colors are red, yellow and blue.
·  Secondary Colors: These colors are created by mixing together two primary colors. The secondary colors are orange, green and purple. Orange is created by mixing red and yellow. Green is created by mixing blue and yellow. Purple is created by mixing blue and red.
· Rainbow: a refraction of the sun’s light through water droplets
· Refraction: the bending of a light ray as it passes through a new medium. In the case of the rainbow, this occurs when light passes through water. When the light rays bend they show all the colors of light! ·  Scavenger Hunt: a game where the participants must find specific items on a list 

For more Sanity Savers projects click here!

Storytime: Kyle Okposo reads Brave As Can Be A Book of Courage

Storytime by Explore & More: Kyle Okposo reads Brave As Can Be: A Book of Courage by Joe Witek

Brave as Can Be:

  1. This story is all about overcoming fears! Can you think of a fear you have overcome? What helped you overcome this fear?
  2. Understanding what emotions look like is a great lesson on empathy for kiddos. At the beginning of the book the narrator shares what it looks like to be scared. By the end of our story our narrator is very brave and courageous! Can you share what you think it looks like to be brave? 

Want another story? Check out our Storytime page for more stories!

storytime: Amelia Schrader reads Bear Snores On

Bear Snores On by Karma Wilson and Jane Chapman

Spring has finally arrived and with that animals will begin to come out of hibernation! Hibernation is when an animal sleeps during the cold months when access to food and water sources are limited. Animals like bears, bats, skunks and groundhogs store up on food in the fall and sleep for several weeks or even months until warmer temperatures arrive!

Check out our Sanity Saver blog for an accompanying at home activity!

Sanity Savers: Bear Snores On – Read-a-loud & Art Activity

By: Amelia Schrader
Senior Manager of Learning and Education

Materials:

Bear Snores On Book (or read-a-loud )
Blue Construction
Paper
Glue
Markers
Cotton Balls (approx. 3) pulled apart

Sanity Savers: Bear Snores On - Read-a-loud & Art Activity

Length:

Story Reading: 3 – 10 minutes
Activity: 15 minutes
Academic Subject: English Language Arts (ELA)Arts Science
Development Subject Areas: Cognition – Knowledge of the World Fine Motor Development

 Spring has finally arrived and with that animals will begin to come out of hibernation! Hibernation is when an animal sleeps during the cold months when access to food and water sources are limited. Animals like bears, bats, skunks and groundhogs store up on food in the fall and sleep for several weeks or even months until warmer temperatures arrive!

Directions:

Step 1: Read the story, Bear Snores On  by Karma Wilson and Jane Chapman. If you do not have this story you can watch a read-a-loud video here.

Step 2: Discuss some of the images in the story. You can use some of the following questions to prompt discussion:
·Have you ever seen any of the animals in the story in person? If so where?
·What other animals have you seen outside?
·What activities do you do differently in winter vs. spring? Are you outside as often in the winter? Do you eat any different foods in winter?
·Have you ever felt left out of a fun activity? What did you do to feel better?
·Have you ever included someone who was left out? How do you think including that person made them feel?
Step 3: Now it is time to make a simple art project related to this story. Start by drawing a bear near the bottom of your piece of blue construction paper. I made a brown bear like the story but you can choose a different color if you want.

Step 4: Add a cave around your bear then add in additional woodland scenery. For my picture I included some trees without leaves and snowflakes.
Step 5: Glue the pulled apart cotton balls around your scene creating a wintery woodland for your hibernating bear!

Vocabulary Words

·Include/Inclusion: To make someone part of a group, place or activity
·Exclude/Exclusion: To deny someone access to or from a group, place or activity.
·Hibernation:  when an animal sleeps during the cold months when access to food and water sources are limited

Want another story? Check out our Storytime page for more stories!

For more Sanity Savers projects click here!

Sanity Savers: All Are Welcome-Read along and Lesson

By: Amelia Schrader
Senior Manager of Learning and Education

Materials:

All Are Welcome Book (or read-a-loud )
Paper (or downloadable worksheet )
Pencil

Length:

Story Reading: 3 – 10 minutes
Activity: 15 minutes

Sanity Savers: All Are Welcome (Read along and Lesson)

Academic Subject:

English Language Arts (ELA)
Development Subject Areas:
Social – Emotional Development
Appreciating Diversity
Adaptive Social Behavior: Empathy  

Diversity, inclusion and empathy are all topics we strive to teach our children. The first Play Zone in our Museum, Being Good Neighbors, is all about teaching these important lessons to our visitors. We know that these important life lessons can often be challenging to discuss on an age appropriate level. Our Being Good Neighbors Zone is designed to get visitors to learn more about the diverse backgrounds of all people that make up our wonderful community through play.  

While we know you cannot visit the Museum right now, this at home lesson, targeted at kids PreK-2nd Grade will help children learn to empathize with a child or community member that maybe feeling exclude for one reason or another. Combining this lesson with a beautifully illustrated children’s book is a great way to start the conversation!  

Directions:

Step 1: Read the story, All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold and Suzanne Kaufman. If you do not have this story you can watch a read-a-loud video here.

Step 2: Discuss some of the images in the story. You can use some of the following questions to prompt discussion:
· Do you have a friend at school who is from a different country?
· Do you have a friend at school who speaks a different language at home other than English?
· Is there anyone in the cafeteria that always brings a lunch to school that is different from yours?
· Do you have a friend at school who moves different from you? Maybe they use a wheeled mobility device, crutches or a walking brace.
· What are some of the things that are the same between you and your friends? Do you all like the same games? Do you have some of the same types of pets?
Step 3: Talk about what it means to include someone vs. excluding someone. Complete the chart pictured below to discuss how it feels, looks and sounds to include someone vs excluding that person.

Vocabulary Words

· Include/Inclusion: To make someone part of a group, place or activity
· Exclude/Exclusion: To deny someone access to or from a group, place or activity.
· Diversity: The differences between people. These can include cultural background, age, appearance, religion, ability level etc.
· Similarity: The qualities that make people alike
· Empathy: The ability to be aware of and understand another persons feelings, thoughts or experiences. 

Want another story? Check out our Storytime page for more stories!

For more Sanity Savers projects click here!